Poetry Books for the Holidays

Waiting for Snow – Keith Worthington

Keith and Renate have books for sale this holiday season: $10 each. Free delivery in Calgary. Visit our website to see samples of our work. Contact us at languageartstudio@gmail.com.P1070831-001poet on a cargo plane

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Figure of Speech

Not young men with families,

not young ladies with college degrees,

just boots on the ground.

 

Not souls, not intellects, not creative hands,

not doctors, not scientists, not keepers of the land.

 

What’s that sound, Father?

Boots on the ground, my son.

 

How many are there, Father?

Ten thousand outward bound.

 

What becomes of them, Father?

Many are lost and never found.

 

Who are they really, Father?

Boots on the ground.

 

Keith Worthington

 

Image result for photos of poppies for remembrance day

 

 

Capitals, either built-up or casual, make a clean, legible, strong impression. Here are several examples of our artwork featuring capital letterforms.

 

excerpt from The Season Settles In - capitals

(Excerpt from THE SEASON SETTLES IN, by Keith Worthington. Renate’s letters are made by manipulating the nib angle of the Capitals.

 

Two examples of Proverbs 25:11, lettered in Capitals, Versal “A”, and Italic. The lettering in the Saint John’s Bible was my inspiration for these pieces.

 

GROWTH: Words and letters by Renate, are presented as a page in the Bow Valley Calligraphy Guild book celebrating one of the BVCG milestones.

CHOCKSTONE by Keith Worthington. Renate’s letters are built-up capitals penned on a translucent vellum overlaying the artwork.

 

WAITING FOR SNOW by Keith Worthington. Renate’s lettering is a mix of Italic letters and informal Capitals.

Lettering with Capitals

Ski Buddies

I was told you were killed near Kandahar
while I skied at Lake Louise.
A roadside bomb awaited you
as I cruised among glades and trees.

Your body parts, they gathered and lay
in a coffin sealed so tight.
They brought you home in the cargo hold
beneath our flag of red and white.

Remember those times (not long ago)
we skied together at Lake Louise?
The same old mountains gathered ’round
to watch us do as we pleased.

Your tour of duty became Kandahar;
mine continued at Lake Louise.
How can there be on the very same Earth
two places such as these?

On my final descent from Top of the World
regret will accompany me
and two young men will disappear
among the ghostly trees.

Keith Worthington

from Poet on a Cargo Plane

Marion, Beside the Lake

A black and white photograph of Mom
on the dock at Lake Minnewanka—
shy smile, stylish dress, young legs.

I like to think she and Dad arrived by train,
Roy’s CPR pass in his breast pocket.
I like to think they held hands in the day coach,
anticipating their future,
excited to be a couple.

This is years before life began to take its toll—
before children, the War, a return to work,
before accidents and other setbacks.

That bright summer day near Banff,
if I had been a stranger strolling nearby,
I would have thought,
What a pretty girl.
What a glorious world.

Keith Worthington

P1030233

Muslim Lady

Heading toward the adjacent rink,
I feel I am confronting her.
We are foreigners:
she with her hijab and long black dress,
me—helmet, visor—full equipment.
I smile; she smiles back.
Our common ground—skates on ice.

She pushes a training aid for balance,
hardly lifting her blades,
as though afraid the surface will crack.
I turn to watch her journey—
elegant in its awkwardness.

Keith Worthington

from After the Flood: Hockey Poems

After The Flood: Hockey Poems